Other Fascial Therapies

In addition to myofascial release, we have trained in many other branches of fascial therapy and sometimes incorporate these into treatments, including:

Craniosacral Therapy

The Craniosacral system extends from the head to the base of the spine and consists of the brain and spinal cord and the soft tissues that surround them.

Craniosacral therapy (CST) is a subtle, non-invasive technique believed to assist the body’s natural ability to heal itself by detecting and correcting imbalances in the craniosacral system.

Because these areas are connected with the other parts of the body via the nervous system, it is believed that gentle manipulation can help to release tension and reduce physical aches and pains, thereby improving acute and chronic conditions, reducing emotional stress and generally improving health, wellbeing and vitality.

Internal Pelvic Floor Therapy

Many people, both men and women, suffer from chronic pelvic pain syndromes which can include sensitive symptoms such as internal pelvic pain, genital pain, pain on intercourse, pain on sitting or standing for prolonged periods, and urinary urgency, frequency or incontinence.

Often many symptoms are caused by hypertonic (too tight) pelvic floor muscles, and in these cases, internal pelvic floor therapy can help to release these restrictions and alleviate symptoms. Our therapists are fully trained and insured to perform rectal and vaginal internal pelvic myofascial therapy.

Rebounding

Research has demonstrated that passive motion (ie relaxing and letting someone else move you) is important for stimulating the body’s own internal repair process in both acute pain injuries and chronic pain conditions.

Rebounding, is a subtle and rhythmic movement technique that is believed to trigger the body’s soft tissue repair mechanism. We tend to use harmonics in combination with other bodywork techniques.

Scar Tissue Release

Scars can be caused by accidents or surgery, and they can range in size from major scarring which affects tissues from the skin to deep in the body, to micro scarring of small areas of muscle fibre. Scar tissue is created from collagen as the body repairs the damaged tissue.

Often the scar you see on your skin is only a fraction of the total – John Barnes calls surface scars the ‘tip of the fascial iceberg’. Over time scar tissue can grow and spread out along natural lines of tension, sometimes attaching onto other structures such as internal organs – these are called adhesions.

As scars spread they change fascial function and alter balance in the body. They can cause pain and other symptoms in other seemingly unrelated parts of the body, often years after the original tissue damage has repaired. For example, a caesarean section scar can cause headaches, or a knee ligament repair can contribute to hip pain.
Scar tissue release is a gentle and very effective way of encouraging the body to undo the excess scarring it has created and reabsorb excess collagen.

Visceral Manipulation

The viscera are the internal organs of the body, such as the liver, kidneys, digestive tract, heart and lungs. Sometimes restrictions can form in the fascial tissue that surrounds and supports all internal organs. This can lead to dysfunction in the organ, which leads to referred pain patterns and other symptoms elsewhere in the body.

Visceral manipulation is a gentle manual therapy where the therapist feels for altered motion within the organs and uses myofascial techniques to release these restrictions and restores natural balance in the body.

Learn More

Myofascial Trigger Point Therapy

What Is
Myofascial Release?

Advanced Massage Techniques